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Category: Supplements

Profiles in Power: Horseradish

Posted in Cleansing, Infection Killing Protocol, Profiles, Supplements, and Troubleshooting

If you’ve been working the UTI protocol, and either your intestinal Candida is barely budging, or the bacteria in your bladder seems oddly unaffected by the natural meds, you’re dealing with a biofilm, whether produced by Candida, or the bacteria.

The presence of Candida biofilm is relatively easy to determine, as I’ve already mentioned in this Troubleshooting post. Many cases are easily eradicated by an activated charcoal cleanse, as outlined here, but in cases where there’s a significant past history of prolonged anti-fungal or corticosteroid use, the treatment is going to be somewhat more complicated. First of all, you want to stay on the Quick and Dirty Cleanse protocol, and you want to get horseradish root (benefits for the bladder and other systems found here) from your local grocery store, and a digestive enzyme supplement like this one. I haven’t observed enzymes to be very efficacious on their own, but paired with horseradish, they may be more effective. (take according to label instructions)

Profiles in Power: The Real Role of Vitamin C in UTI Treatment

Posted in Cellulitis, Infection Killing Protocol, Profiles, Supplements, and Useful Tips

I know, I know…I threw some heavy shade on it in the Emergency Relief post. That’s because the vast majority of UTI’s are caused by the gram negative bacteria E. coli, which as I cover in The pH Connection, is highly acid-adaptive. Ascorbic acid Vitamin C, the most common form, is highly acidifying in the urine, meaning it’ll hurt more than it will help with an E. coli infection.

In E. coli, ascorbic acid is taken up and metabolized by a specific phosphotransferase system and a series of enzymatic reactions

There’s Vitamin C in the lemon juice you’re using to keep your bladder flushed out, so it’s not like you’re not getting any, you’re just not taking the acidic form.

While even alkaline forms of Vitamin C seem to have limited effect on most UTI bacteria, if you’ve had your UTI cultured and it’s caused by staphylococcus or strep, you should drop everything and go directly to ascorbic acid. In large doses it slaughters antibiotic-resistant gram positive infections with an enthusiasm that puts Mongol hordes to shame. I fell over this fact while I was searching for a cure for a serious cat bite infection.

Profiles in Power: Oregano Oil

Posted in Infection Killing Protocol, Profiles, and Supplements

This is one of those things that everyone swears by, yet I had virtually no luck with it when I first tried it. All of the anecdotes and research sounded very promising, but after taking a whole bottle of capsules and seeing little benefit, I dismissed it as another internet myth.

However, I realized later that both trials I made with it occurred before I discovered the gut/bladder connection. When I developed a post-antibiotic UTI recently, I had lots of oregano oil on hand due to trying it topically for the vicious case of staph. I did a quick charcoal cleanse and took OLE and oregano oil only, and drank lemon water.
That UTI was dead in just a few days.

Profiles in Power: The Unbeatables

Posted in Infection Killing Protocol, Profiles, Supplements, and Useful Tips

new-piktochart

I’m going to profile each of the most effective supplements, and do a post on each of the compound groups and how and what they kill, and then I’m going to write profiles of UTI-causing bacterias and cross-reference them so you know how to kill your infection no matter what type it is…and this post is the start of that. Listed in the graphic above are the most effective natural infection-killers. The things listed in the top two lines are the most effective killers, so make OLE, garlic, and cayenne your backbone, with ginger tea or horseradish or black walnut as adjuncts, if desired.

It is important to remember that the organosulphurs must NOT be heated, but many of the others can be made into tea.
The cayenne pepper and black pepper can be mixed into honey, 1/4 tsp pepper to one large spoonful of honey.
If you have any medical conditions other than a UTI, and especially if you’re on medication for them, please google anything and everything before taking it, to see if there’s an interaction you need to be concerned about. The terpenes cannot be taken with beta blockers, for instance. Necessary cautions and warnings will be listed in the individual profiles of all of these compounds and all of the posts will be in the same category for ease of perusal.

Profiles in Power: Activated Charcoal

Posted in Spending Wisely, and Supplements

In all honesty, you guys, when I read about this stuff I thought it sounded like snake oil. It’s supposed to do what? Then, I got the worst rash of my entire life last winter: it was so painful I couldn’t sleep for more than 3 hours at a time before it woke me up.
I’ve always had sensitive skin, and I got careless and used my husband’s Old Spice deodorant once, and next thing you know, my pits were on fire. I could tell that yeast was a major player, which made sense because I’d been on amoxicillin a few weeks before (for a UTI it didn’t cure: cayenne pepper killed that). It wouldn’t have been so bad if only I hadn’t tried Monistat on it, but how was I to know I was allergic to that, too? It immediately got exponentially worse, and even coconut oil with minced raw garlic steeped in it could barely keep up.
I was in a lot of pain, and wearing old rag shirts because I absolutely reeked of garlic. It was a rough winter…I have pictures, but I’ll spare you.

Anyway, a friend of mine who’s a retired nurse suggested activated charcoal. I’d heard of it and thought it sounded totally kooky, but by then I was desperate to get a full night’s sleep…and stop smelling like the morning after the night before at an Italian restaurant. I also thought it would be rather nice to wear real clothes and leave the house again.

Profiles in Power: Olive Leaf Extract

Posted in Infection Killing Protocol, Profiles, Spending Wisely, and Supplements

If you’ve read the blog posts on UTI protocols, you know that OLE plays a central role in killing all kinds of infections. The active ingredient in OLE is oleuropein, which is a highly bio-available phenolic acid effective against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Combined with the fact that it’s completely non-toxic to human cells,

It is reassuring to know when considering olive leaf extract dosage, that it has very very low toxicity. (Even water taken in excess can be toxic).
In tests using oleuropein, one of the major active constituents, researchers were unable to find the toxic dose.* Other complete extracts used in animal tests and on human tissues had no ill-effects on the cells tested.


lowers bad cholesterol, restores BP to healthy levels, and has been shown to destroy cancer cells
we have ourselves a winner, here. The honey badger of herbal medicine.

Honey-Badger-Dont-Care

 

Supplies You’ll Need

Posted in Cleansing, Immediate UTI Treatment, Infection Killing Protocol, Spending Wisely, and Supplements

I’m putting this in a pinned blog post, since I realized that it isn’t very noticeable as a page when you’re on a mobile device.

Olive Leaf Extract: My favorite is Vitacost, because it’s the best quality and price. Here’s the Vitacost link. This Swanson Super Strength is the best one sold on Amazon, next to Vitacost, which is more expensive there than on the Vitacost site.

Raw garlic: (Any grocery store produce section: buy the heads, not the stuff in the jars)

Fresh baking soda from the store: The stuff you have lying around the house is almost guaranteed to taste horrid, because it absorbs odors.

Lemon juice: You’re going to want a big bottle, or lots of lemons and a juicer.

Cayenne pepper: (Any grocery store spice aisle: the capsules are unnecessary. Mix the loose powder into a spoonful of honey, instead. If you take this and feel increased irritation, discontinue use; it’s not helpful against the type of bacteria you have.)

Oil of oregano: I used the Vitacost liquid and filled empty capsules with it, but they’re out of that, as of this writing (4/5/17). I should think that the stuff in the capsules would work, too. Use for E. coli infections AFTER a cleanse, alongside OLE. It’s much more effective in the bladder once you’ve gotten any intestinal Candida out of the way. Here’s a reputable brand, on Amazon.

Vitamin C: I’ve had recent experience with this absolutely slaughtering a staph infection deep in my skin: if you have a staph UTI, go for it. Any standard ascorbic acid from the grocery store is fine: look for 1000 mg capsules like these.

Activated charcoal: ⇐ Click for the good stuff. You can get these in capsules from a local store, but in the quantities you’ll want to take to cleanse your gut and prevent future UTI’s, the loose powder form is far more cost-effective. It’s completely odorless and tasteless: all you have to do is stir it into a glass of water and chug it. You can also make poultices from it for skin infections, wounds, and for a sore urethra. If you’re determined to buy the capsules, these are the best ones: they’re 500 mg, when the store ones are generally 260 mg.

Coconut oil: This is what you want to use as a base for vaginal treatments for current infections, and for preventive maintenance.

Cinnamon/Ginger: (You can grate a fresh ginger root from the store, or get a jar of powdered ginger or cinnamon in the spice aisle. Warning: About 4% of UTI’s are caused by a strain of E. coli that responds very negatively to ginger and turmeric. If you take either and feel increased bladder pressure, discontinue immediately. That strain also responds badly to cayenne pepper.)

UTI tests: These are so much cheaper online than in the store, it’s ridiculous. You can get 25 for around $12, or this kind right here if you want to be a total UTI data nerd.

Here’s the link for 8 parameter strips for those of you in the U.K. 

Probiotics: Ladies, I tried this kind right here, and I’m IN LOVE. I talk about what it has in it in this post, and I wasn’t kidding. It’s awesome sauce, with a side of fanfreakin’tastic. It went Search and Destroy on bad guys in my hoohah that a coconut bullet didn’t reach, because those two Lacto strains go all Delta Force strike team up in there. Place it high at bedtime, because you want them staying in your lady cave and not going spelunking in your urethra.

 

For gut repair after repeated antibiotics: L-glutamine to regenerate your gut lining, and pair this probiotic with Femdophilus.
Also, licorice helps your stomach lining, your acid production, and your adrenals, all of which benefits your gut.
Digestive enzymes would also be a good idea until you’ve re-established a healthy probiotic population in your regenerated gut lining.

Deciphering OLE Supplement Labels

Posted in Spending Wisely, Supplements, and Useful Tips

image

So, you’re at the local hippie store trying to find some OLE, and this looks good, right? It says 18% right there in black and white! This is what you’re going to see on the store brand OLE labels.

At first glance, you’d think you’re holding some quality OLE in your hot little hands, but look again at that label. See how it’s split into olive leaf extract, and olive leaf?
Those are 400 mg capsules, and they have 215 mg of olive leaf extract with 18% oleuropein, and 185 mg of olive leaf, which is basically useless filler.

What you’re really holding is about 9% oleuropein, total. Those 400 mg capsules have 38.7 mg of active ingredient. To contrast, Vitacost OLE, my favorite, has 90 mg of oleuropein in a 500 mg capsule, for a true 18% active ingredient.

Many health food stores carry Gaia brand in addition to a store brand, and guess what % of active ingredient that has?